Intel’s Computex Keynote: We’re Investing in Touch, Putting User Experience First

Tom Kilroy of Intel

Today at Computex, Intel SVP of Sales and Marketing Tom Kilroy gave a keynote addressing the company’s latest advances in mobile technology, including its just-released Ivy Bridge platform for Ultrabooks. In an hour-long speech filled with demos, the Intel exec showed off the capabilities of current Intel-based smartphones, tablets and Ultrabooks while signaling his company’s strong support for touch technology.

Opening Thoughts

Before Kilroy took the stage, Intel showed a sample video about Ultrabooks, explaining that they are “putting the user at the center of the computing universe.”  Kilroy then took the stage and said he wanted to talk about how Intel is shaping the future. He spoke about the evolution of computers from mainframes to business PCs in the 1980s to the age of the Internet and now the age of the user. 

“The user experience matters more now than ever,” he said. “Let’s face it. We’re humans before we’re users, so experiences are sensed: what we see, what we hear, what we feel. The fuel for that is content.”

He said that users consume more than an exabyte a day of content and cited a Gartner study showing that, by 2016, 19 percent of mobile traffic will come from smartphones and 33 percent from tablets. 

User Habits

Kilroy said that, with smartphones, computing power is king, and in that space Intel should be well positioned to succeed with its new mobile chips. Intel-based phones, he said, provide full HD playback and capture, can shoot 10 pics in a second and browse faster. 

He then spoke about Intel-based tablets, saying the focus is Windows 8, not Android. He said Intel-based Windows 8 tablets are coming in 20+ OEM designs and should deliver all-day battery life.

Tablets and Phones

Kilroy then called a rep onstage to demo Intel phones and tablets with its latest mobile processor. Craig showed how a phone can run 360 degree interactive HD video of London. He also demoed the phone’s Wireless Display capability by outputting karaoke lyrics to a big screen. He showed the platform’s performance capability by playing a game of “Fruit Ninja.”

Ultrabooks

Kilroy then talked about Ultrabooks. According to a Cisco report, 66 percent of college students said that the PC is most important device in their daily lives, not tablets or phones. He pulled back a curtain to reveal more than 50 Ultrabooks behind him on stage. 

Ultrabooks

Kilroy talked about all the components that had to shrink in order to create some of the Ultrabooks. He used an augmented reality demo to show the transition to SSDs, flat batteries and other parts needed to achieve the thin Ultrabook form factor. He thanked the vendors in the Computex audience for making it happen.

 Next, Kilroy spoke about security and the kinds of anti-theft and management capabilities that are available in Ultrabooks.

Intel and Touch

Kilroy talked about the importance of touch. He announced that Intel is investing in touch by giving money to jump start factory capacity and focus on 13-inch and larger tablets.

Investing in Touch

To show the value of touch, he called up Acer president Jim Wong, who showed off the touch screen on the Acer Aspire S7 Ultrabook.

Then ASUS chairman Jonney Shih came on stage to show off the new Zenbook Transformer (which has a pop-off screen) and the ASUS Taichi (which has a second screen on the back of its lid).

Sight, Touch and Sound

Kilroy then called Craig back on stage to demonstrate how Ultrabooks stimulate the senses. He showed an Ultrabook allowing him to log in via facial recognition then check his email, weather and movie tickets through touch.

Craig also showed how well voice recognition works on Ultrabooks by launching and posting to Facebook via his voice. He said the voice control software, which we believe was Dragon software, could now support Mandarin input and called a Taiwanese pop star on stage to post to Facebook via Mandarin voice.

Closing Thoughts

Kilroy closed by talking about Intel’s strategy of iterating every year with new die shrinks and faster processors, but he said none of the coming innovations would be possible without the assistance of the manufacturers and developers in the audience. 


AUTHOR BIO
Avram Piltch
Avram Piltch
The official Geeks Geek, as his weekly column is titled, Avram Piltch has guided the editorial and production of Laptopmag.com since 2007. With his technical knowledge and passion for testing, Avram programmed several of LAPTOP's real-world benchmarks, including the LAPTOP Battery Test. He holds a master’s degree in English from NYU.
Avram Piltch on
Facebook Twitter Google+
LEAVE A REPLY
Name*
Email* (will not be published)
Website
*Indicates required field
Comments*
Submit Comments

FIND A REVIEW
Laptops
All Product Types Accessories Cars Digital Camcorders Digital Cameras eReaders GPS Laptops MP3 & Video Players Projectors Smartphones Software Storage Tablets / MIDs VoIP Wi-Fi
All Subcategories
All Subcategories All-Purpose Budget Business Desktop Replacement Gaming Multimedia Netbook Nettop Rugged Student Tablet PCs Ultraportable
Brand
Acer Alienware Apple Archos ASUS Averatec BenQ CTL Corp. Dell Digital Storm eMachines Emtec Everex Fujitsu GammaTech Gateway General Dynamics Getac Gigabyte Hercules HP HTC iBuyPower Intel Lenovo MSI Nokia Nvidia OCZ OLPC OQO Origin Panasonic Sager Samsung Sony Sylvania Systemax TabletKiosk Toshiba Verizon Viewsonic Viliv VooDoo Workhorse PC ZT Systems
Minimum Rating
Any Rating Editor's Choice 4.5 Stars 4.0 Stars 3.5 Stars 3.0 Stars
Screen Size
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 4 5 6 7 8 9
Resolution
1024x576 1024x600 1024x768 1200X800 1280 x 720 1280x1024 1280x768 1280x800 1366x678 1366x768 1440x1050 1440x900 1600x768 1600x900 1680x1050 1680x945 1920x1080 1920x1200 800x400 800x480
Weight Range
10.1 - 12.0 pounds 12.1 - 14.0 pounds 14.1 - 16.0 pounds 2 lbs 2 pounds and under 2+ lbs 2.1 - 4.0 pounds 4.1 - 6.0 pounds 6.1 - 8.0 pounds 8.1 - 10.0 pounds Over 16 pounds Under 2 pounds
more options
SUBSCRIBE