Dear Della, Sexism Doesn’t Sell Laptops

notebook_diva1If a Web site were to be designed by a PC manufacturer to market its laptops and netbooks to men, what would it look like? Would the tips section be full of pointers on how to stream porn? Or how to check sports scores more efficiently on a shrunken screen? Doubtful, because men already know how to use a laptop, right? It also would perpetuate a stereotype that all men partake in those activities at their computers. And of course, we all know that not all men spend their time at the computer scouring the Interwebs for dirty pictures of Miss California. Tell me then. Why has America’s top PC manufacturer, Dell, created a site for women about their computer use? The Austin, Texas company launched Della, a site to market its newest and uber-stylish laptops to women. The page, which reminds me of a birth control ad in a magazine, is blanketed with images of very attractive women using Dell-branded notebooks like the XPS 13 and the Inspiron Mini 10. The Tech Tips page, with its patronizing “Seven Unexpected Ways a Netbook Can Change Your Life,” is full of stereotypes of how women’s lives can be changed with a mini-notebook. (I’d be the first to admit netbooks have life-changing qualities, but really? Really?!) “Track your exercise and food intake at free online sites like Fitday,” is Tip Number One, like any self-respecting women’s magazine would recommend. Number two: Find recipes online (just because we have laptops doesn’t mean we don’t still belong in the kitchen). Dell, is this all you think us women do with our laptops? Or do you think women are that slow at the technology uptake that we don’t know that a netbook is capable of these activities? The word “choice” itself is downright demeaning. Not only are netbooks described as “cute,” but on Dell.com, the Dell Inspiron Mini 12 is described with terms including “productive.” On the Della portal the Mini 12 allows you to “stay connected to your favorite entertainment including email, shopping and more.” Again, do you think all us women do is pull out the plastic? I commend companies, especially Dell with its new Adamo and its Design Studio, for making products that are more aesthetically pleasing and thus more appealing to women. It’s a huge step beyond painting a laptop pink and saying it’s now for the fairer sex. However, creating a Web site that tells women these products are for our shopping habits and cooking for our men puts us in an even worse place than those pink-covered laptops were in to begin with: as unsophisticated, separate and non-equal tech users compared with men. This site presumes that women have different computing “needs,” as if we don’t know how to use a “real” laptop. The stereotypes reinforced in this campaign are appalling. Guess what, Dell? Women ARE tech-savvy and shouldn’t be placed in a separate box when it comes to technology. We want options just like men, and notebooks that pack power, functionality and, YES, style. We don’t need a Petitcoat 5 or a separate site telling us women, and us women alone, how to make the best “use” of a laptop. I don’t see Dell creating a site marketing its laptops or netbooks to men any time soon, so it is my hope that we can say Ciao to Della, very soon. Whether she’s roaming the streets of Taiwan or burning up the phone lines, LAPTOP News Editor Joanna Stern is responsible for getting the scoop on the latest must-have mobile gadgets.  Her Notebook Diva column appears on Tuesdays.

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  1. Krystal Says:

    Amen, sister! I was kinda dumbfounded when I heard about “Della”. One of the things I detest most, is someone assuming that just because I’m a girl, I don’t know jack about computers. While I’m no overclocking whiz, I’m not an idiot either. Could Dell come up with something a little less insulting?

  2. zak89 Says:

    Meaning no harm, does it occur to you that Dell might be targeting a market other than the females that BLOG ON SITES LIKE LAPTOP.MAG? Most women that I know who use computers significantly are not techies interested power, options, or more choices (i.e, they are more likely to run from a site like “dell.com”); they just want a computer that maybe looks “pretty” (often that isn’t even a big issue), doesn’t cost too much, and that lets them, say, surf the web, check email, do online shopping…

    Now where have I heard of computer site that aims at these people?…

  3. Liz Says:

    ‘who use computers significantly’……?

    Frankly, the description of what constitutes ‘significant use’ is offensive; it panders purely to the existing stereo types!

    Like Krystal, I may not be an overclocking whiz… or a gaming nut… but I’ve been in IT for 30 years and use computers in earnest all the time. I’ve got a salaried position as a database developer… and I have two private businesses which are all based around computers and graphics. Which is, admittedly, a long way from when I started in the industry as a hardware designer and programmer.

    Some of us enjoy using the damned machines – and yes, I don’t toe the line with MS either – and their purile adverts that are so stereotyped! I run linux, love it – and don’t have to reboot every hour in order to get work done!

    So – Dell are being ‘silly’, I suppose you could call it. I had considered them a good company… and maybe the hardware still is good… but if I ever buy it, it’ll be because the hardware is good – and not because a ‘twee’ little website is trying to convince me of anything!

  4. ido Says:

    its not a secret that men are more interested in tech than women. just visit any forum about tech, go to any meetup that involves technology or check out classrooms where any type of technology is taught…youll find more often than not majority men.
    i applaud dell for marketing technology to women in a nicely laid out website. with tech decisions being made mostly by men in a household (dont burn me for that comment…just saying more often than not), dell is trying to shift that decision making process (or at least the secondary purchase of under $350) to women. Its a smart move that could really add to netbook sales. will the strategy pay off? who knows? but i think its a good one.

  5. sprinkles Says:

    We need to lose weight and get back in the kitchen eh? I was offended when I heard about this on Engadget. Tech savvy or not, women don’t want to be told their fat, need to cook, spend their or their SO’s money, and are too stupid to figure out the “big boy’s site”. In my experience, people regardless of gender who do not get along well with tech information go find someone to help them out. Dell(a) isn’t empowering women to know WHAT they’re buying, they’re just talking down on them and putting in pretty colors. You want to empower non-tech savvy shoppers Dell? How about some information on the customization / build pages! Give the shopper the option to find out more information right there in plain English. No reason to start with separate-but-not-quite equal. We already have enough of that in this country.

  6. Stacey Higginbotham Says:

    Bravo, Joanna. Glad to see someone calling folks out for assuming women care about technology only so much as it can make them look fashionable, swap recipes and organize their kids’ social lives. All fine uses, but clearly not the only thing any PC buyer cares about. And it looks like Dell changed their top tip from tracking fitness to promoting it as an e-book reader. Although I’d like to see better tips on figuring out what kind of wireless connection is most appropriate for different use cases. Should I splurge for 3G or just rely on Wi-Fi?

  7. Maddy Says:

    This kind of condescending attitude is one of many reasons I didn’t go with Dell when I bought my newest laptop last month. I hope their faux “female-friendly” marketing strategy fails, and I bet it will. Women are usually not in the mood for condescension when they’re buying laptops.

  8. TsuKata Says:

    Hear, hear!

    And, in response to ido, just because women don’t frequent on the (very male-biased) engadget doesn’t mean they aren’t into computers. Check out some less guy-focused tech sites, such as geeksugar, and you’ll quickly see that there’s a large female tech geek population. And, quite frankly, to buy a laptop, you don’t need to be a geek. It’s entered the realm of an appliance rather than a techtoy. (I’m not sure where you get your stats about decision-making. Based on the research I’ve seen, which, unfortunately, is not public, you are mistaken. I’m curious if you’re basing it on anything more than your own perceptions.)

    While I like the idea of marketing to women, I think Della misses the mark entirely. It falls back on ancient stereotypes rather than reality.

  9. NeoteriX Says:

    Accepting the numerous problems with Dell’s approach, is there an appropriate way to gender-market for computers or is the argument that gender-marketing is inappropriate altogether?

  10. Dbndon Says:

    Great points, Joanna! Addressing “color, cut and clarity” pertains to precious stones. For computers, most users want to hear about functionality, power and cost.

    So . . . if asked if I would I use a pink computer, the answer would be simple: How fact is the connect speed and will it do everything I want?

  11. Niels Says:

    So because a minority of women work in IT and “ARE tech savvy” Dell is not allowed to target a large market of consumers who DO actually mostly use their laptops for facebook, ebay, youtube etc.

    I’m sure they did their research and found out what most of us can confirm with anecdotal evidence already: A lot of women don’t care too much about computer specs and find the way they’re presented off-putting.

    Should I as a metrosexual man feel offended by the way trucks are marketed? Or coke zero ads, because they’re a cliche that doesn’t accurately reflect my life? Give me a break.

  12. NeoteriX Says:

    “…and found out what most of us can confirm with anecdotal evidence already.”

    I would argue this is a dangerous concept/conclusion. First, stereotypes are harmful precisely because they have some small truth in anecdotal evidence, however, that generalization to the greater population often results in glass-ceilings, pigeon holing, etc. If we were make the analogy to race, would you think differently? Does your anecdotal experience with pan handlers, engineers, the homeless, day laborers, or criminals demonstrate any racial patterns? Do you think that is ok?

    Similarly, I know plenty of men without a solid understanding of computers. The point is that there are perfectly normal non-gendered ways in promoting technology. For example, one can instead appeal to the subgroups — people (men, women, families) who are less than tech savvy, without resorting to generalizations or stereotypes. Or one can appeal to specific roles, like athletes or homemakers, without catering to just one gender.

    What I’m interested in knowing is what gender-targeted methods, if any, do women find to be appropriate for technology.

  13. ido Says:

    men AND women who are tech-savvy dont need to visit a manufacturers website to figure out information about new technology. For example, if I, who considers myself tech-savvy, wanted to know which netbook to buy…i wouldnt visit the websites of asus, dell, hp, acer, samsung etc…i would know the specs without anyone marketing it to me from other research and comparison sites / blogs.
    Dell is simply trying to make the netbook more mainstream and marketing it to a gender specific group. sales of netbooks have been growing exponentially, but may it seems dell is noticing that there is a segment of the market that isnt buying and according to dell, SHOULD be.
    Also, everyone here knows the pros/cons of a netbook, but there is a huge portion of the population that is JUST finding out what a netbook is. So if dell markets a conceivably NEW product to that portion of the population, they can instill a sense of what a netbook is to SOME people, NOT ALL.
    For the record, in one click on that promo page, you can get all a list of ALL specs on the computer you are customizing.
    It also seems like there is a dichotomy, do women want plain english text helping them understand the differences between computers OR do they want the total spec sheet in all its glory for them to figure out (or give to a more qualified male OR female friend ; ) to explain in plain english).

    So women dont want tech marketed to them with benefits of eating better, getting healthier and learning to relax? Why not? the iphone does it and no one has a problem with that.

    Marketers use sex as a way to appeal to men all the time. does anyone have a problem with that?

  14. Jayjay76 Says:

    Erm, if you are a woman with technical knowledge or background, couldn’t you just use the dell.com site?

    There is a segment of the consumer market to whom this would be beneficial and allow them to understand computing a bit better, you could argue that by previously not having this site, Dell were taking an exclusionist attitude.

  15. Jayjay76 Says:

    Ah, NeoteriX answered my question quite well:

    “Similarly, I know plenty of men without a solid understanding of computers. The point is that there are perfectly normal non-gendered ways in promoting technology. For example, one can instead appeal to the subgroups — people (men, women, families) who are less than tech savvy, without resorting to generalizations or stereotypes. Or one can appeal to specific roles, like athletes or homemakers, without catering to just one gender.”

  16. Niels Says:

    A little bit ironic as well that this should be published by the self-proclaimed “notebook diva”

  17. NeoteriX Says:

    ido Says:

    “Dell is simply trying to make the netbook more mainstream and marketing it to a gender specific group.”

    Yes, you’ve stated the obvious intent. The real question is “How are they doing it?” and whether it is appropriate.

    “Also, everyone here knows the pros/cons of a netbook, but there is a huge portion of the population that is JUST finding out what a netbook is.”

    Yes, a huge portion of the population, with members that are *both* male and female.

    “So if dell markets a conceivably NEW product to that portion of the population, they can instill a sense of what a netbook is to SOME people, NOT ALL.”

    Yes, and the category of “SOME” people does not have to be defined by gender lines. It can be defined by role or occupation: student, professional, retiree, homemaker, chef, fitness enthusiast, engineer.

    “It also seems like there is a dichotomy, do women want plain english text helping them understand the differences between computers OR do they want the total spec sheet…”

    Plain English does not mean “belittling” or “resorting to cliched stereotypes.” Plus, as stated repeatedly, many men, kids, and the older generation can benefit from a plain English description as well… why limit to just women?

    “Why not? the iphone does it and no one has a problem with that.”

    I don’t follow the iPhone closely, and challenge you to demonstrate where such a gender-specific approach has been taken. It seems very likely to me that whatever you’re referring to appeals to “lifestyles” and not “genders” but I’m interested in seeing.

    “Marketers use sex as a way to appeal to men all the time. does anyone have a problem with that?”

    This has to be a joke. :)

    Uh, yes. Many women have a big problem with the objectification from using women/sex to appeal to men. If most men weren’t so ignorant and deaf to those objections, you probably wouldn’t make such a silly point.

  18. ido Says:

    “Yes, you’ve stated the obvious intent. The real question is “How are they doing it?” and whether it is appropriate.”

    By marketing to a group of people (in this case women) who may not know how netbooks can be used. All because some tech-savvy women arent impressed with the campaign, doesnt mean its inappropriate.

    “Yes, a huge portion of the population, with members that are *both* male and female.”

    Correct, but Dell decided to capture this particular market…maybe they are planning something for men, who knows.

    “Yes, and the category of “SOME” people does not have to be defined by gender lines. It can be defined by role or occupation: student, professional, retiree, homemaker, chef, fitness enthusiast, engineer.”

    Of course it CAN be, no one is disputing that…Dell just decided NOT to in this case. On their normal dell.com page, they describe laptops that should appeal to kids, artists, professionals…so they seemingly do both – target a student, a child an employee (without gender-specific lines)

    “Plain English does not mean “belittling” or “resorting to cliched stereotypes.” Plus, as stated repeatedly, many men, kids, and the older generation can benefit from a plain English description as well… why limit to just women?”

    I guess I fail to see or agree that della belittles women. Have you ever used A computer (any type) to look up recipes online? to keep track of fitness goals? Ever considered a tech toy with how well it fits in your purse? As a guy, ive certainly evaluated tech toys like cellphones with how well they fit in my pocket and if someone marketed a cell phone to me based on how well i can slip it into my front pocket, id be sold, not insulted (lets pretend this was 3 years ago when not everyone was as tiny as they make them today).
    Everyone can benefit from a plain English description – AMEN! 100% agree. so since they are starting with less than tech-savvy women and not everyone at the same time, they are completely in the wrong??? give them some credit for doing what other companies dont, albeit starting with a small segment of the population. You assume that dell thinks youre stupid by the way they are marketing their product. They are just NOT marketing this product to YOU because they dont need to.
    Also, if DELLI (get it, like deli meat) was started and marketed to men showing how easy it is to check sports scores, i would disregard the message and not be insulted. do i check sports scores online? nope, i dont care too much for sports. would i be insulted that Delli was catering to men who liked sports and assumed a cliched stereotype that ALL men like sports??? absolutely not, because i understand that many men do like sports and would enjoy knowing how easily they can keep up with sports on their netbook (i have a friend who bought a netbook to sit in front of the tv and watch other sports while the tv is on)…am i forgetting that women like sports as well – nope…they just arent being targeted.

    “I don’t follow the iPhone closely, and challenge you to demonstrate where such a gender-specific approach has been taken. It seems very likely to me that whatever you’re referring to appeals to “lifestyles” and not “genders” but I’m interested in seeing.”

    youre right, i may have been mistaken. i could have sworn i saw a commercial about a specific iphone app that was gender specific but i looked and seemed to appeal to a lifestyle. ill keep searching and let you know if i find something.

    “This has to be a joke.”

    Nope. Axe sells deodorant by showing how attractive you are to the female population with two sprays of axe body spray and even hint at your chances of getting laid. they are using sex to sell. its not about feelings its about marketing sales strategy. and in some instances, it works.

  19. NeoteriX Says:

    ido writes:
    “Nope. Axe sells deodorant by showing how attractive you are to the female population with two sprays of axe body spray and even hint at your chances of getting laid. they are using sex to sell. its not about feelings its about marketing sales strategy. and in some instances, it works.”

    I’ll just address this one part: You’re missing the point you yourself were trying to make in your previous post. You asked: “Marketers use sex as a way to appeal to men all the time. *does* *anyone* *have* *a* *problem* *with* *that*?”

    And I said, yes. Yes some people do have a problem with the use of sex to appeal to men in advertising. You may only think that sex in advertising is ok because you don’t know any better. (See, eg, http://safarimari.vox.com/library/post/my-letter-to-axe-about-their-raunchy-commercials.html , http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/living/2004050655_axeads03.html )

    The issue is not “whether sexist advertising works.” I’m sure the Axe campaign worked wonders for Unilever–I know that I’ve tried it myself in college. The issue is whether for some people, it is offensive, or wrong. As a society, we aren’t supposed to always make decisions because they work, but with regard to the ethics and morality behind them.

    Now, there is a healthy debate as to what the proper boundaries of advertising are: what constitutes sexism, how much sexism is “okay”, etc. with legitimate arguments on both sides. However, the debate starts with acknowledging and accepting that some people are offended, and that they have a legitimate right to feel that way.

    I’ll just leave with one last note: if it has been historically the case that women have been positioned as homemakers, and that this societal belief has led to reduced decisional capital in the family, inequality in pay, and a glass ceiling for women (among other things), why *wouldn’t* the continued stereotypical portrayal of women be *at least* somewhat problematic?

  20. ido Says:

    ok, fair enough Neo. i cant argue with how something makes you feel. i dont think it was the intention of Dell nor do i think you should be offended…but thats how you feel and i respect that.
    Launching a product to appeal to the masses is no easy feat. In trying to segment the market they offended the people they left out, but that will happen in almost every case they try and segment a market.

    “i” honestly dont see the della campaign as positioning women as homemakers…they portray women as wanting to exercise, cook, travel, organize their life, eat healthier, and participate in “cloud” computing. In this campaign, i see women gathering together to check things out on their computers, a woman walking with her netbook while on the phone and a woman laying on the grass with her netbook….what stereotype of women are they really portraying…do you see any cartoons with women slaving away in the kitchen for their husbands like there was in the 1950s?

    maybe, JUST maybe, they are trying to target the woman of the 21st century with a life of her own and not in the context of an inferior partner to male. this site is geared towards women NOT women and how they relate to men.

    I sort of see where you are coming from but I think this campaign empowers women to think about technology in a way they might not have thought of before as opposed to looking at the campaign and thinking “wow, im offended, i know technology and why does dell think all i like to do is cook”

  21. pHreaksYcle Says:

    Until I meet girls in public that will bite the bullet and admit they use computers for more than Facebook and MySpace and iTunes, I will continue to treat every single one like they are a techno-tard.

    Statistically speaking of course.

  22. SarahatDell Says:

    We appreciate and thank everyone for their feedback about the site. In response, we have already made some changes to the site’s content and additional edits will be made over the next several days. As we continue to refresh the content and offerings of the site, your feedback is critical.

  23. petals121 Says:

    Techno-tards….hmm.

    Maybe the real problem is that lots of women are only willing to do as much, or as little, as society, media, advertising firms…the men in their lives….expect them to do….and no more.

    Which, of course, makes it harder for the rest of us.

  24. deecro Says:

    Well, pHreaksYcle, you’re a dolt then, aren’t you? I’m a video editor, and I have a vagina! Amazing, isn’t it.

  25. Matt Galloway Says:

    “making products that are more aesthetically pleasing and thus more appealing to women.”

    Shame on you! As a man who has a great appreciation for design I’m offended by the notion that my gender somehow prevents me from appreciating aethetics. May I respectfully request that you practice what you preach… or do we need to make an exception for women?

    I hear what you are saying and generally agree, but be careful not to argue in the absurd – being offended by “choice” seem a stretch to me. The same folks that think your gender belongs in the kitchen also stereotype you as irrational… Don’t let your passion prove them right.

    -Matt

  26. Mackenzie Says:

    pHreaksYcle:
    So I should assume all males of college age are bad with Linux, since well…the ones I know don’t even know how to make packages or (in some cases) use vi? Sure, the older guys I know are fine with it, but those college boys…

    By the way, given that the first computer programmer was a woman, the people to program the first digital computer were all women, and that the compiler was invented by a woman, how did anyone ever get the idea that women just aren’t interested in technology? Eventually, men started programming and then after a while there were equal numbers of men and women. And then the women started bailing out less than 30 years ago.

    Someone up near the top of the thread said that when non-tech-savvy people are looking to get a computer, they just get someone tech-savvy to help. That was always my role in the family. Know what would let non-tech-savvy folks shop independently? On the build page, explain the differences between CPUs. Explain that a Celeron has less “cache” which means that switching tasks is faster (at least, I think the smaller L2 cache means a smaller context switch penalty) but that applications may run slightly slower than non-Centrino with the same number of GHz. More cores mean it can do more things at the same speed, but that the applications won’t individually run any faster (face it, little is properly multithreaded these days). Explain that more RAM means it can do more at once and faster (like install updates, download email, and play music while you type a paper or play a game). Explain that hard disk means how much stuff you can hold with realistic comparisons like 1 GB = about 15 CDs ripped to MP3 or 1 DVD = about 4 and a half GB along with a note that the operating system will take up about 15GB (they’re using Vista right?) on its own. Don’t put “CD-RW / DVD / DVD-RW” as options. Put “CD-RW (CD player that can burn and reburn) / DVD (DVD player) / DVD-RW (DVD player that can burn and reburn)”.

  27. Jessica Says:

    Mackenzie – I agree so much. And thank you for mentioning the role of women in computer programming. And about linux.

    Most of the people defending this just simply don’t realize how sexist they’re thinking is. They see non-techie computers as such a large group, but I see just as many men non-techies out there as women, only difference is men non-techies (from my experience, at least) simply pretend to be knowledgeable when they don’t have a clue. Yes men and women are different in some ways. Our body chemistry does affect our physical attributes and gives one gender certain advantages over the other (at least a jumpstart, not talking about potential). But whats that got to do with computers? Nothing!

    Yes I am a woman. I am a computer programmer, a linux user, a geek. I can compile my own kernel and make changes to large and popular open source programs. I prefer a basic text editor rather than a GUI or some sort of program that writes the code for me. I love having control over my operating system. I’m not the only one out there!

    Would it be ok for Dell to come out with a website dedicated to the stereotypical black population? Treating them as though they have no idea how to use a computer and focus on the “Bling” factor of the computer and come up with some sort of offensive item that a black person can do with their laptop?

    People assume a nontechie girl will avoid sites with intimating terms about the computer. Why not just make the main site as easy to read for a nontechie as you can and have a separate section for techie people that has much faster and shorter descriptions of the computers? Why not have a section to help teach you what each item means, even if its a highlight caption for each techie word?

    Besides I wish we could just stop with this whole dumbing down of people when it comes to technology. News flash. People do like knowing these things! They’re not into computers enough to want to take classes or to research at times, but if you just give them the information in a way they can read it, they will probably be glad to learn something new! Not all but you’ll find most people do. I dont know too much about cars, but if someone who does decides to give me a little advice or teach me something you’d bet I’d be glad to learn! No I wouldn’t want to learn how to assemble the car from top to bottom, but I would like to learn how to do basic repairs and tips on how to take care of my car! Non-techie people used to use DOS for crying out loud! Yeah they wasn’t too happy with it but they were able to learn how to use it, imagine that!

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